NEWS

Rehabilitation and construction of Baraka Dhi Sahar District

Within the activities of #Food_for_Assets financed by the World Food Program (WFP), the pool of Dhi Sahar was rehabilitated and built in Anas District - Dhamar Governorate, where the participants carried out leveling works and cleaned the canals from rain and torrential wastes, as well as cutting and collecting stones to build the missing parts of the pool walls to conserve water For long periods of time, protection fences were also installed to ensure clean water preservation, building special ponds for drinking animals and special places for other uses such as washing clothes and others, and this contributed to the obtaining of approximately 3000 residents of this region access to clean and pure water from any pollution and also contributed to the reduction Among the risks that children and pregnant women are exposed to due to the transportation of water from far away places, as well as enhancing and supporting livelihoods, providing temporary job opportunities and producing sustainable assets.

The institution’s success in signing a contract

The Foundation (#SDF_YEMEN) is keen on social and financial education for millions and to empower children to make change
Towards a sustainable future The Foundation has succeeded in signing a partnership agreement with the Plato International Organization
It is based in Amsterdam, in the Netherlands

#Sustainable Development # Plato # Membership
#SDF #SDFYEMEN

What is the Plato Organization

Plato International is a partner of the Sustainable Development Foundation in the field of social and financial education for thousands of children about Yemen to empower them

From making change towards a sustainable future and developing high-quality curricula targeting different age groups.

It is flexible to be applied by its local partners to suit their own communities and it provides teachers with training in Plato's methods.

For active, child-centered learning that enhances life skills and financial culture through the Five Core Elements.

In this context, the organization provides its available contents and more generally its expertise in order to keep pace with some projects

Financial education targeting young people.

#Sustainable Development # Plato # Membership

#SDF #SDFYEMEN

The institution’s success in signing a contract

The Foundation (#SDF_YEMEN) is keen on social and financial education for millions and to empower children to make change
Towards a sustainable future The Foundation has succeeded in signing a partnership agreement with the Plato International Organization
It is based in Amsterdam, in the Netherlands

#Sustainable Development # Plato # Membership
#SDF #SDFYEMEN

What is the International Council

What is the International Council of Voluntary Agencies - ICVA?
ICVA is an international network established in 1965 and includes more than 100 institutions working in humanitarian affairs, concerned with:

- Humanitarian advocacy operations.
The link is the link between the two humanitarian actors.
Sharing and exchanging experiences and information among its members.
Cooperation in public issues.
#Sustainable Development Foundation # Membership
#SDF #SDFYEMEN #ICVA

The Foundation for Sustainable Development obtained membership

Based on the Foundation’s keenness to empower economically, enhance educational opportunities, contribute to peace building, and coordinate and contribute to advocacy processes. #SDF is a member of the International Council for Humanitarian Institutions (ICVA)
The Foundation for Sustainable Development (# SDF_YEMEN) is the first institution in # Yemen to obtain this membership.
The Foundation also succeeded in signing a cooperation partnership contract with the International Plato Organization.
We wish the institution more success and success.

#Sustainable Development Foundation # Membership
#SDF #SDFYEMEN #ICVA

The Foundation for Sustainable Development honors humanitarian youth

The Foundation for Sustainable Development honored the humanitarian volunteers for the year 2020 AD at the headquarters of the Foundation .. where a number of activists in voluntary work who made a difference in humanitarian work were honored as a gesture from the Foundation for its interest in voluntary work and its impact on society

 

 

 

 

 

 

Winter clothing distribution campaign

Within the activities of the protection monitoring project and providing shelter assistance to the displaced and those affected by the war, funded by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the Foundation today launched a campaign to distribute winter clothes for the displaced, as this activity targets 778 families in the governorates of Sana'a and Dhamar.

 

رمز "تم التحقق منها بواسطة المنتدى"

Distribution of shelter materials in the city of Hajjah

Within the activities of the emergency response project for shelter and non-food items for the most affected families in Hajjah governorateFunded by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs .. Today, shelter materials were distributed to 300 displaced families in Hajjah city. The distribution was attended by the Director of the Supreme Council for Management and Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs and International Cooperation in The governorate, the shelter block coordinator, and the leadership of the Foundation's branch in Hajjah Governorate.

Distribution of non-food items

Within the activities of the project ... emergency response to shelter and non-food items for the most affected families, funded by the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, the Foundation's team distributed non-food items to 300 displaced families in Bani Qais district, Hajjah governorate.

Distribution of shelter materials.

As part of the activities of the project ... Monitoring protection and providing shelter assistance to the displaced and war-affected people,

One of the Foundation's projects wins the Ashden International Energy Prize in the context of humanitarian work

Sana’a, Yemen – 2 July: A United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Yemen project that addresses solar power needs and provides solutions and hope for three frontline conflict communities has been announced as the winner of the acclaimed Ashden Awards for Humanitarian Energy. “UNDP Yemen is our first ever winner for energy in a humanitarian setting and we were especially inspired by the empowered role the women have in the ownership of the community microgrids,” says Harriet Lamb, CEO of Ashden.

UNDP Yemen has been recognized as one of the world’s most practical and scalable low carbon innovators and was among 11 winners selected from over 200 global applications in the areas of creating resilience, green growth, and fairer societies.

As part of a UNDP-managed joint project, the Enhanced Rural Resilience in Yemen (ERRY), the initiative addresses two major issues for the communities of Hajjah and Lahj: access to affordable and sustainable energy and providing sustainable income to Yemen's most vulnerable population, women and youth.

Cutting the cost of energy by 65 per cent, UNDP has worked with the women and youth to train, develop and manage micro-grid businesses to help electrify their communities one home and business at a time. “Community-owned solar microgrids are an ideal low carbon energy solution in any circumstance but is even more powerful given the conflict and ongoing hardship in Yemen,” says Harriet Lamb, CEO of Ashden. The project has helped 2,100 people gain access to disposable income and 10,000 people with access to sustainable energy.

In a country where women do not enjoy equal status, especially in the realm of work, this not only provides them with an opportunity to provide their families with food, shelter, medicine and other vital supplies, it allows them to have a voice in community decision making and to gain community respect. Rural women launching their own business is a remarkably rare undertaking in the country. “The project was not easy to get off the ground,” says Project Lead, Eman Hadi. “We went through a lot to establish this project because of the perspective Yemenis have on working women,” she indicated.

Before the conflict started in 2015, only 23 per cent of Yemenis had access to energy. The crisis has led to a deeper energy-related problem as fossil fuels continue to surge and embargos make it more difficult to obtain. Before the crisis, the cost of 20 litres of fuel was $7; today it costs up to $40, and is hard to come by, even in stations.

The UNDP programme has enabled communities’ access to affordable energy when there are no other viable solutions, by applying unique, low-cost and sustainable solar microgrid solution. Instead of fuel costing 42 cents an hour, solar energy costs only 2 cents, enabling the average person access. The solar microgrids offer an alternative, clean and renewable energy source that allows rural homes and businesses the ability to afford undisrupted electricity for hours.

“UNDP’s solar micro-grids provide a solution and hope in communities that have found themselves on the conflict’s frontlines,” said UNDP Resident Representative Auke Lootsma. “This allows communities an opportunity to regain some control of their future and allows the women and youth to take extreme pride in their business during a time of uncertainty and extreme difficulty.”

UNDP’s project is generously supported by the European Union and implemented with partners. Winning the Ashden Award will help UNDP to scale-up the solar micro-grids across Yemen, further cutting carbon emissions, support more vulnerable families and will keep important services like schools and health centers open during the conflict. Working with the private sector, it will be possible to move from micro to mini- grids to cater to more communities.

“The project is well-timed and has come during a period when more limitations and challenges are occurring for Yemenis. Working toward local renewable energy solutions that are combined with economic opportunities for the most vulnerable can help prepare Yemen to build back better,” says UNDP Resident Representative Lootsma.

UNDP supports the affected people and communities by conflict, war and pandemic by addressing humanitarian, development and peace building issues through economic, governance and peace support operations.  UNDP works across Yemen to help people meet their most basic needs, restore livelihoods, support communities, and advance peacebuilding.

***

UNDP is the leading United Nations organization fighting to end the injustice of poverty, inequality, and climate change. Working with our broad network of experts and partners in 170 countries, we help nations to build integrated, lasting solutions for people and planet.

Ashden’s mission is to accelerate transformative climate solutions and build a more just world. Through awards and programmes, Ashden promotes and supports climate and energy innovators – including businesses, non-profits and public sector organisations. About Ashden Awards.

       
One of the Foundation's projects wins the Ashden International Energy Prize in the context of humanitarian work

Sana’a, Yemen – 2 July: A United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Yemen project that addresses solar power needs and provides solutions and hope for three frontline conflict communities has been announced as the winner of the acclaimed Ashden Awards for Humanitarian Energy. “UNDP Yemen is our first ever winner for energy in a humanitarian setting and we were especially inspired by the empowered role the women have in the ownership of the community microgrids,” says Harriet Lamb, CEO of Ashden.

UNDP Yemen has been recognized as one of the world’s most practical and scalable low carbon innovators and was among 11 winners selected from over 200 global applications in the areas of creating resilience, green growth, and fairer societies.

As part of a UNDP-managed joint project, the Enhanced Rural Resilience in Yemen (ERRY), the initiative addresses two major issues for the communities of Hajjah and Lahj: access to affordable and sustainable energy and providing sustainable income to Yemen's most vulnerable population, women and youth.

Cutting the cost of energy by 65 per cent, UNDP has worked with the women and youth to train, develop and manage micro-grid businesses to help electrify their communities one home and business at a time. “Community-owned solar microgrids are an ideal low carbon energy solution in any circumstance but is even more powerful given the conflict and ongoing hardship in Yemen,” says Harriet Lamb, CEO of Ashden. The project has helped 2,100 people gain access to disposable income and 10,000 people with access to sustainable energy.

In a country where women do not enjoy equal status, especially in the realm of work, this not only provides them with an opportunity to provide their families with food, shelter, medicine and other vital supplies, it allows them to have a voice in community decision making and to gain community respect. Rural women launching their own business is a remarkably rare undertaking in the country. “The project was not easy to get off the ground,” says Project Lead, Eman Hadi. “We went through a lot to establish this project because of the perspective Yemenis have on working women,” she indicated.

Before the conflict started in 2015, only 23 per cent of Yemenis had access to energy. The crisis has led to a deeper energy-related problem as fossil fuels continue to surge and embargos make it more difficult to obtain. Before the crisis, the cost of 20 litres of fuel was $7; today it costs up to $40, and is hard to come by, even in stations.

The UNDP programme has enabled communities’ access to affordable energy when there are no other viable solutions, by applying unique, low-cost and sustainable solar microgrid solution. Instead of fuel costing 42 cents an hour, solar energy costs only 2 cents, enabling the average person access. The solar microgrids offer an alternative, clean and renewable energy source that allows rural homes and businesses the ability to afford undisrupted electricity for hours.

“UNDP’s solar micro-grids provide a solution and hope in communities that have found themselves on the conflict’s frontlines,” said UNDP Resident Representative Auke Lootsma. “This allows communities an opportunity to regain some control of their future and allows the women and youth to take extreme pride in their business during a time of uncertainty and extreme difficulty.”

UNDP’s project is generously supported by the European Union and implemented with partners. Winning the Ashden Award will help UNDP to scale-up the solar micro-grids across Yemen, further cutting carbon emissions, support more vulnerable families and will keep important services like schools and health centers open during the conflict. Working with the private sector, it will be possible to move from micro to mini- grids to cater to more communities.

“The project is well-timed and has come during a period when more limitations and challenges are occurring for Yemenis. Working toward local renewable energy solutions that are combined with economic opportunities for the most vulnerable can help prepare Yemen to build back better,” says UNDP Resident Representative Lootsma.

UNDP supports the affected people and communities by conflict, war and pandemic by addressing humanitarian, development and peace building issues through economic, governance and peace support operations.  UNDP works across Yemen to help people meet their most basic needs, restore livelihoods, support communities, and advance peacebuilding.

***

UNDP is the leading United Nations organization fighting to end the injustice of poverty, inequality, and climate change. Working with our broad network of experts and partners in 170 countries, we help nations to build integrated, lasting solutions for people and planet.

Ashden’s mission is to accelerate transformative climate solutions and build a more just world. Through awards and programmes, Ashden promotes and supports climate and energy innovators – including businesses, non-profits and public sector organisations. About Ashden Awards.

#World_Day_Against_Child_Labour

World Day Against Child Labour 2020 focuses on the impact of crisis on child labour. The COVID-19 health pandemic and the resulting economic and labour market shock are having a huge impact on people’s lives and livelihoods. Unfortunately, children are often the first to suffer. The crisis can push millions of vulnerable children into child labour. Already, there are an estimated 152 million children in child labour, 72 million of which are in hazardous work. These children are now at even greater risk of facing circumstances that are even more difficult and working longer hours.

Health centers services

In light of the difficult health conditions that our country is going through, the following health centers (Fares Center, Masrouh Center, Khamis Mestaba Center, Al Sarhat Center, Al-Dahr Center,

Al-Mukhlifah Unit, Bani Rassam Unit) are being targeted by the project .. Providing basic health services in The districts with the highest priority Hajjah Governorate
By providing all its services effectively effectively through a cadre of doctors, assistants and nurses who work with all their energies in order to provide primary, secondary and emergency health care in addition to providing maternal and child care services and educational services for the residents of these areas as they are considered areas with the highest priority, as these have been supported Centers are equipped with basic medicines, equipment, supplies, tools, medical supplies, and maintenance, as well as the capacity of the health staff to respond quickly to disease and epidemics.

Work resumed

Today, the Foundation's staff resumed its work in various sectors after the Eid Al-Fitr holiday
With all precautionary measures and measures required to prevent the emerging coronavirus (Covid 19)

Together to confront ... Corona virus

Distribution of shelter materials.

As part of the activities of the project ... Monitoring protection and providing shelter assistance to the displaced and war-affected people,